Antiquarian Art Co.

Original Vintage French Art Deco Bronze of a Panther by Max Le Verrier

Original Vintage French Art Deco Bronze of a Panther by Max Le Verrier


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Directory: Fine Art: Sculpture: Bronze: Pre 1940: Item # 1449332

Please refer to our stock # 898 when inquiring.
Antiquarian Art Co.
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A beautiful original vintage Art Deco French bronze statue of a seated panther by Max Le Verrier Paris artist signed c.1930 measuring 11.75" W x 10.5" H x 4.75" D. Artist Biography Art Deco, which is widely considered to be an eclectic form of elegant and stylish modernism, was influenced by a variety of sources - among them were the so-called "primitive" arts of Africa; as well as historical styles such as Greco-Roman Classicism; and the art of Babylon, Assyria, and Ancient Egypt- updated by aerodynamic designs. At that time, the women's liberation movement was making significant progress. Bobbed hair and short skirts (to dance the lively Charleston) characterized the iconic figure of the "flapper" called garçonne in French, meaning "boy" with a feminine suffix. This new "in motion", slim and slender, shortly dressed, female silhouette, was an important source of inspiration for Max Le Verrier when he created his collection of dancers, gymnasts, and Art Deco lamps. He continued to work on this theme and also one concerning animals, using a precise linear fluidity and simple shapes. The captivating beauty of his creations, not only can be judged by the extreme detail of the hands and faces sculpted, but also by the elegance and charm of the poses of his sculptures. Louis Octave Maxime Le Verrier was born in Neuilly sur Seine on January 29, 1891. His mother was Belgian, and his father was a Parisian goldsmith and jeweler on Boulevard Malesherbes in Paris. His parents divorced when he was 7 years old. He attended several boarding schools including Collège de Verneuil sur Avre and was a brilliant student. His interest in drawing and sculpture occurred early, and he practiced his craft on wooden rulers, which he turned into little houses, churches, and other small items. His father thought that his future should be in farming; therefore he sent his son to St. Sever and La Reole to study agriculture against Max's wishes. However, Max Le Verrier kept alive his liking for sculpture during his spare time. At the age of 16, he returned to Paris and did odd jobs to escape farm-work and to provide for himself, and his father left him to fend for himself. In 1909, when he was 18, he left for England but As a foreigner, it was very difficult for him to find a job in London, so he returned to France. This period was an aviation era, which fascinated many youth of that time. He met a Frenchman named Jameson, who bought a plane on credit, and, together, they opened an aviation school in Rendon. The business was difficult. Jameson gave his part to a rich, well-off Englishman na