Antiquarian Art Co.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1930 item #1282296 (stock #675)
Fred Wagner Pastel of a bay landscape with sail boats in the distance. Archival framed.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #986816 (stock #296)
George Bacon Wood fishing dory on the beach oil on board signed lower left. This painting was exhibited at the Salmagundi Club in New York in 1897. In excellent condition measuring Approx. 7 x 9 with liner 8 x 10 inches. overall size 12 x 14. Biography, George B. Wood, Jr. was born into a Quaker family in Philadelphia on January 6, 1832. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Christian Schussele and probably saw the Exhibition of English Art there in February 1858. The exhibition laid out the work of those English painters that were following the precepts of the English painter and critic, John Ruskin. Wood as well as many of his contemporaries from Philadelphia were deeply influenced by the Ruskinian ideal and began to paint according to the precepts of "Truth in Art". Wood's neighbor and friend in Germantown, Pennsylvania, William Trost Richards, was one of the leaders of the movement and probably encouraged Wood to paint to this heightened perception of physical reality. Wood began exhibiting at the Pennsylvania Academy as early as 1858 and at the National Academy of Design by 1861. The American Ruskinians organized by 1863 with a house organ called The New Path, which was published from 1863 to 1865. His artist friends and their writings probably led to Wood's acceptance of the style and ideals of Ruskinian painting. Wood spent the Civil War years painting mainly in the area surrounding Philadelphia, but judging from the titles of his paintings, he also took a few longer trips. In 1866 he rented a studio in central Philadelphia, and the following year he moved downtown. At about this time he began summering (and even spending an occasional winter in the early 1870s) in the Adirondacks near Elizabethtown, New York. By 1870 he was married and well established as an artist. Wood exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy from 1858 to 1869 and again from 1876 to 1887. He also exhibited at the National Academy of Design from 1861 to 1885 and the Brooklyn Academy of Art in 1886. A member of the Philadelphia Sketch Club and the Philadelphia Artists' Fund Society, he was generally part of the artist community in that city. By the seventies, Wood had turned from landscapes to documenting Philadelphia streets and interiors, but at the end of the decade added photography to his arts. In 1883 Wood traveled abroad, recording the sights in carefully rendered watercolors. Some of these sketches served as sources for later, more highly finished work he submitted to the Pennsylvania Academy in 1884 and 1887.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1294731 (stock #689)
Original oil Floral with Chinese Hibiscus on art panel signed lower right W. Revell dated 1888. Measuring 7 x 9 inches
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1267255 (stock #650)
Original David Roberts lithograph of Jerusalem from the Mount of Olives, April 8th 1839, plate 6 from Volume I of The Holy Land engraved by Louis Haghe 1806-85 pub. 1842. Original hand colored deluxe edition. In good antique condition some age discoloration minor fading spotting. Framed matted actuall image 12" x 18" framed matted 21 x 27 framed size.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1113717 (stock #484)
A fine original watercolor by James David Smillie of a street view in Nice France signed lower right and titled and dated Nice Feb. 1893 lower left. On the reverse is an exhibit label from a exhibit at the American Watercolor Society. A fine example of this important American Artist. Measuring approx 8 x 12 image and framed in a fine gold leafed period frame overall 16 x 20. Provenance Hirschel Adler Gallery New York

Biography

A native of New York and the son of an engraver, James David Smillie earned his early reputation for his etching skills but later for watercolor landscapes. He began etching at age 8, learning from his father, James Smillie (1807-1885). At age 14, he did a set of plates illustrating John Milton's epic poem, Paradise Lost. He had a job as a bank note engraver, and then he and his father had a business, collaborating as engravers with a specialty of bank-notes. They also did the engravings for the 1857 Mexican Boundary Survey Report. James David Smillie helped organize the New York Etching Club, and he was the U.S. representative to supply examples of American etchers' work to the Painters-Etchers Society of London. Although he continued working with etching, drypoint, aquatint and lithography, in 1865, he began doing landscape painting and was especially interested in mountain scenery. Smillie traveled in California in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, in Colorado in the Rocky Mountains, and in the eastern United States in the Catskills and Adirondacks. From these trips he did illustrations that were published in 1872 in the magazine Picturesque America. In 1881, Smillie got married, and the couple had two sons. By 1884, he was in France, and spent much time there doing prints of landscapes, figures, portraits and cityscapes. Between 1888 and 1896, he produced a set of drypoint floral still-life prints. James David Smillie founded the American Watercolor Society and served as president and treasurer. He also taught classes at the National Academy of Design in 1868 and from 1894 to 1903.

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1189421 (stock #584)
A charming oil on copper panel of young street boys playing dice with a dog and another eating scraps. Measuring 8x10 inches framed in a quality antique frame 13 x 14 overall size. A charming painting would enhance any collection.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1960 item #485816 (stock #111)
A beautiful ethereal Laguna beach seascape at sunset with incredible tonality and use of light. Oil on board signed lower left and dated 1956 measuring 12 x 16 inches and framed in a quality gallery frame measuring overall 20 x 24 inches in excellent condition. A fine example of this remarkable American Artists work.

Biography

A painter of realistic landscapes reflecting a vanishing wilderness in America, Robert Wood (not to be confused with Robert E Wood) is reportedly one of the most mass-produced artists in the United States. His painting became so popular he was unable to meet all of the demands, and many of his works were reproduced in lithographs and mass distributed as prints, place mats, and wall murals by companies including Sears, Roebuck. He was born in Sandgate, Kent on the south coast of England near Dover, the son of W.L. Wood, a famous home and church painter who recognized and supported his son's talent. In fact, he forced his son to paint by keeping him inside to paint rather than playing with his friends. At age 12, Wood entered the South Kensington School of Art. As a youth, he came to the United States in 1910, having served in the Royal Army, and he never returned to England. He traveled extensively all over the United States, especially in the West, often in freight cars, and also painted in Mexico and Canada. His itinerant existence took him to Illinois where he worked as a farmhand, to Pensacola, Florida where he married, briefly in Ohion, Seattle, Washington, and Portland, Oregon. In 1912, he was in Los Angeles, and In the late 1920s and early 1930s, in San Antonio, Texas, where he lived and in 1928 exhibited in the "Texas Wildflower Competition." From San Antonio, he gained a national reputation for his strong colored, dramatic paintings. Some of that prestige has been credited to his asssociation with Jose Arpa, prominent Texas artist. Wood also gave art lessons, and one of his students was Porfirio Salinas. During this period, Wood sometimes signed his paintings G. Day or Trebor, which is Robert spelled backwards. In 1941 he went to California and painted numerous desert and mountain landscapes and coastal scenes. He lived in Carmel for seven years, and then moved to Woodstock, New York, but he soon returned to California, settling first in Laguna Beach, then San Diego, and finally in the High Sierras, where he and his wife built a home and studio near Bishop and lived until his death in 1979.

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1940 item #1090485 (stock #424)
August Ludecke-Cleve (1868-1957): A beautiful antique German impressionist Landscape of cows in a meadow with a view through the trees. Bold brush work and bright colors. This is a very good and large example of this artists work. Measuring approx. 32 x 43 inches in excellent condition. Provenance: Stanford Museum Sale. Artist Biography: August Ludecke-Cleve first studied at the Art Academy in Dusseldorf then at the Munich Academy. Before the second world war (his studio was bombed) he had exhibitions in Dusseldorf. Ludecke-Cleve was better known for his landscape paintings before the war but from the 1930's onwards cows and tulips became his trade mark.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1940 item #1140997 (stock #508)
An original conte crayon drawing of a male nude by Couse framed in a quality 24k gold leaf frame. Provenance the estate of the artist with estate stamp on the reverse. Eanger Irving Couse (1866–1936) was an American artist and a founding member and first president of the Taos Society of Artists. He is noted for paintings of Native Americans, New Mexico, and the American Southwest. His house and studio in Taos have been preserved as the Couse/Sharp Historic Site, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the New Mexico Register of Cultural Properties. In 1911 Couse was elected to the National Academy of Design.[3] He also became active in the Taos art colony. In 1915, Couse was one of the six founding members of the Taos Society of Artists, and was elected first president. Another founding member was the artist J. H. Sharp, who adapted a chapel near Couse's house as a studio. Later Sharp built a combined house and studio on the land. The adjacent properties are recognized jointly as the Couse/Sharp Historic Site, and are preserved and operated by the Couse Foundation. Among Couse's works in public galleries are Elkfoot (National Gallery, Washington); The Forest Camp (Brooklyn Museum of Art); The Tom-Tom Maker (Lotos Club, New York); Medicine Fires (Montclair Gallery, New Jersey); and Shapanagons, a Chippewa Chief (Detroit Museum of Art).
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1950 item #580285 (stock #247)
Frank Montague Moore Carmel or Monterey evening nocturne oil on board signed lower right F.M. Moore. A beautiful painting with a amazing sense of light. In excellent condition measuring 12 x 16 inches approx. overall size 19 x 23 inches. A fine painting by this highly acclaimed artists would be a nice addition to any collection.

Biography

Born in Taunton, England on Nov. 24, 1877. Moore studied at the Liverpool Art School and Royal Institute. In 1903 he immigrated to America and further studied with Henry Ward Ranger. By 1910 he was an established artist in NYC; in that year moved to Hawaii where he was purchasing agent for Hawaii Plantations and later served as director of the Honolulu Academy of Arts. In 1928 he sailed for California and worked briefly in Pasadena where he painted the Picture Bridge, a series of 41 murals in the Huntington Hotel. After a few months in San Francisco, he settled on the Monterey Peninsula. There he specialized in poetic depictions of the coast and other local scenery. Moore died in Carmel, CA on March 5, 1967. Member: Salmagundi Club; NY WC Club; AFA; Pasadena Society of Artists. Exh: Calif. WC Society, 1928; Nicholson Gallery (Pasadena), 1928; CGA; PAFA; St Louis Museum; GGIE, 1939; LACMA, 1942; Salmagundi Club, 1943; Santa Cruz, 1944; Society for Sanity in Art, CPLH, 1944 (1st prize and Logan medal); Carmel AA, 1945-46; NAD. In: Orange Co. (CA) Museum; USMC Headquarters (SF); Auckland (NZ) Museum; Honolulu Academy of Art. Source: Edan Hughes, "Artists in California, 1786-1940"

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1235603 (stock #620)
Fine Hudson River School painting of a couple picnicking along the banks of the Hudson the gentleman fishing. Signed lower left S. H. Thurston and 19th century New York artist. Oil on canvas measuring 22 x 29 inches.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1910 item #579184 (stock #233)
Julian Walbridge Rix early California landscape oil on wood panel scene of Marin county landscape looking toward Mt. Tamalpias and San Francisco bay. Measuring approx. 10.5 in. by 13 in. framed in a ornate gilt frame 18 in. by 20 in. overall. A fine example of this renowned artists work.

biography

Known for poetic landscapes, often sunset, illuminated by atmospheric light, Julian Walbridge Rix was early in his career an active painter in California and then on the East Coast. He was born in Peacham, Vermont on December 30, 1850 and moved with his family to San Francisco in 1853. Because of his mother's death, he went back to Peacham four years later to live with his grandmother and graduating from Peacham Academy in 1868. He returned to San Francisco where he was apprenticed to a trading firm and later worked in a paint store painting signs and doing decorative work. Primarily self-taught, he was briefly a pupil of Virgil Williams at the School of Design. He became close friends with Amédée Joullin and Jules Tavernier, and when the latter established an art colony in Monterey in 1876, Rix was one of the "Bohemians" who followed him there. His studio in Monterey was in the French Hotel, but in 1879 he returned to San Francisco and shared a studio with Tavernier at 729 Montgomery Street. The art market in San Francisco during this period was not a healthy one which prompted Rix to move to Paterson, New Jersey in 1880 and subsequently establish a studio in New York City. This milieu was what he seemed to need to find artistic success. His work was exhibited at the National Academy of Design during the 1880s. He studied art briefly in Europe during 1889 and upon his return, he found that his watercolor and oil paintings were in great demand in the East. He maintained an active interest and participation in the San Francisco art scene and in 1883 sent back 200 paintings for a successful solo show. In 1888 his illustrations appeared in "Picturesque California." Rix returned to California for several months in 1901 and painted the valleys and mountains near Monterey and Santa Barbara. A handsome man with a New England accent and blond sideburns, he never married and was called the Adonis of the profession. Following a kidney operation, Rix died in New York City on November 24, 1903 and was buried in the cemetery plot of a patron-friend in Paterson, New Jersey. Source: "Artists in California, 1786 to 1940" by Edan Milton Hughes

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1910 item #1104093 (stock #468)
An original Portrait of a Cavalier or noble man oil on canvas signed lower right and dated 1911. Measuring 10 x 12 inches in a fine antique frame overall 16 x 18. in excellent condition a fine example of this important American artists portrait work.

Biography

Born in Ogdenburg, Germany, Henry Raschen became one of America's leading painters of Indian portraits and figures in the 19th and early 20th centuries and was the first California artist to be committed to Indian themes. He also painted still lifes and landscapes, the latter with skillful play of light and shadow. In 1868, he and his family emigrated to Fort Ross, California where they spent one year and then settled in San Francisco. He took early art lessons at the San Francisco Art Association under Charles Nahl and Virgil Williams and also studied with noted figure painter of altar pieces, Joseph Harrington. Feeling the need for more extensive training, he went to Munich in the late 1870s and became part of the numerous California artists then studying in Munich at that time. There he became friends and a painting companion of William Merritt Chase, and he also traveled in Italy and France. In 1883, he settled in San Francisco and for the next eight years went with landscape painter Carl Von Perbandt on excursions among Indian tribes of California and the Southwest, and he gained much attention for the life-like quality of his paintings. From 1890 to 1894, he lived and had his studio in Munich where he was a successful painter and teacher, and after returning to San Francisco, won the gold medal at the Munich Exposition of 1898. He went on an expedition with Army General Nelson A. Miles when Miles and his troops captured Apache Chief Geronimo at Skeleton Canyon, Arizona, 30 miles northeast of Douglas. Many years later in Oklahoma, Raschen sketched Geronimo whom he visited in prison at Fort Sill. In the early 20th century, a key person in establishing Raschen as a major artist in San Francisco was Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, mother of publisher William Randolph Hearst. In 1906, damage from the earthquake and fire caused him to move across the bay to Oakland where he painted until his death in 1937. Source: Edan Hughes,

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : Pre 1930 item #1263623 (stock #639)
Gustav Adolph "Dolph" Hensel was born in Germany and came to the U.S. in 1906. He was a Lutheran minister who settled in Wisconsin and later moved to San Francisco, where he was pastor of St. John's Reform Church until 1922. Hensel was also an artist who mainly painted portraits and religious genre. He spent three years as a missionary in Africa during the 1920s, and it may have been during this period that he painted this middle eastern scene. His nickname was "Dolph" and many of his paintings are signed 'D. Hensel," as in this example. Presented in the original frame canvas 12" x 14".
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1106752 (stock #471)
A fine original oil painting on board 18 x 26 inches signed lower left J.W. Curtis and dated 1893. A scene of the Australian blue mountains and the famous three sisters mountain. excellent condition. A fine example of this important Australian artists work. Known for his paintings in black and white which he exhibited at the Victorian Academy of Arts, in the 1880s.

Biography

James Waltham Curtis (1839-1901) was an eminent Australian colonial artist whose work lives on as a tribute to Australia’s early days of European settlement. His approach is of technical, poetic and historical interest, emphasizing man’s battle with a primeval landscape and nature, his picturesque landscapes being fine examples of the late 19th century period which preceded the Heidelberg School. Curtis was an English painter and illustrator who it is believed, came to Australia during the Gold Rush. Curtis’ work plays an important part in the preservation of Australian history and is an excellent reminder of how life was in the latter part of the 19th century.

The Three Sisters

The Sisters were formed by erosion. The soft sandstone of the Blue Mountains is easily eroded over time by wind, rain and rivers and the cliffs surrounding the Jamison Valley are being slowly broken up. [edit]Aboriginal legends The commonly told legend of the Three Sisters is that three sisters (Meehni', 'Wimlah' and Gunnedoo') lived in the Jamison Valley as members of the Katoomba tribe). They fell in love with three men from a neighbouring tribe (the Nepean tribe), but marriage was forbidden by tribal law. The brothers were not happy to accept this law and so decided to use force to capture the three sisters. A major tribal battle ensued, and the sisters were turned to stone by an elder to protect them, but he was killed in the fighting and no one else could turn them back. This legend is claimed to be an Indigenous Australian Dreamtime legend.[1] However, Dr Martin Thomas, in his work "The artificial horizon: imagining the Blue Mountains",[2] clearly shows that the "aboriginal" legend is a fabrication created by a non-Aboriginal local Katoomba, Mel Ward, presumably to add interest to a local landmark. The story originated in the late 1920s or early 1930s and is unknown prior to that date. The Aboriginal traditional owners, the Gundungurra, have a legend that includes the Sisters rock formation. They are currently[when?] developing a website which will include these traditional stories.

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1940 item #989005 (stock #312)
A beautiful oil on board by Harold Christopher Davies of a a California impressionist landscape from his early days before he became a abstract modernist. Provenance the estate of the artist and Hoover Gallery of San Francisco. Measuring approx. 10 x 7 inches framed in a quality gallery frame overall size 9.5 x 12.5 inches. A fine example of this artists work. Harold Christopher Davies was a painter with whom art came first and commercialism last. Though he was a remarkably passionate and somewhat prolific artist, he resisted gallery representation until the age of eighty-four, just one year before his death. Davies began his formal art education at the age of fourteen, enrolling in the Corcoran Art Institute in Washington, D.C. Later he continued his studies at the San Francisco Institute of Art. An abstract expressionist, his style was directly influenced by Cezanne, Gorky and de Kooning. Being a man of intense dedication to his art, he kept extensive notebooks and sketchbooks in which he developed his own artistic and aesthetic philosophy, often through his candid critiques of other artist’s works. Painting, for Davies, was not a means of earning his living. Though he exhibited frequently at various local colleges and museums, he never sought public recognition of his talent. He believed fame compromised the integrity of an artist’s work. Davies earned his living as a businessman, eventually owning and operating his own chemical company. He lived a life of balancing his monetary obligations with the true love of his life: painting. After living in a variety of cities around the United States, Davies moved to Inverness, California in 1969 where he was free to devote all his time to his art. MEMBER: Oakland Art League San Francisco Art Association Huntsville (Ala.) Art Association EXHIBITED: San Francisco Art Association, 1921-1931 Oakland Art Gallery, 1931 Birmingham Museum, 1951 Southampton Museum, 1959 University of Long Island Museum, 1964 Parrish Art Museum, 1964, 1966, 1967 Hoover Gallery (San Francisco), 1975 Fresno Art Center, 1976 (Solo) Haggin Museum 1982 Huntsville Museum, 1982
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1166446 (stock #560)
An original painting by famed Irish artist Roderic O'Conor a profile portrait of a Tahitian woman probably influenced by his friend Paul Gaugin as O'Conor did not travel to Tahiti. Watercolor on paper atlier stamp lower right and initialed lower left. measuring 8 x 12 inches in excellent condition. Provenance Crane Kalman gallery London sold in 1959 to James Costigan Esq. Biography

RODERIC O’CONOR An exact contemporary of Charles Gruppe, O’Conor is listed as both Irish and Irish-American (by Bénézit, in error). His place of birth was Roscommon, Ireland (on 17 October 1860). Regarded as Ireland’s most progressive painter of his time, O’Conor was close to both Gauguin and Armand Seguin in the Pont-Aven region, and he was wealthy enough to purchase paintings by Cézanne, Gauguin, Renoir, Manet, and others. O’Conor studied art in Dublin (1879-83), Antwerp (1883), then in Paris under Carolus-Duran and at the Académie Julian. He was working in Grèz-sur-Loing in the 1880s (Jacobs, 1985, p. 33), and began exhibiting his works at the Salon des Indépendants in 1890. Later he would take part in the Salon d’Automne. O’Conor first came to Brittany in 1890, and two years later he executed Yellow Landscape at Pont-Aven (Barnet Shine Collection, London). At Pont-Aven, O’Conor also did engravings. The Irishman befriended Gauguin there, also in 1892. The latter tried to persuade his “drinking buddy” O’Conor to accompany him to Tahiti. The Irish painter was certainly as avant-garde as Gauguin. Breton Peasant Knitting, already post-impressionistic, was painted in 1893, and The Farm at Lezaven, Finistère (National Gallery of Ireland), a year later. According to tradition, O’Conor inspired the character of Clutton, the failed artist in Somerset Maugham’s Of Human Bondage. The letters between Seguin and O’Conor were published in 1989, as Une vie de bohème. In the introduction, Denys Sutton describes how O’Conor served as Seguin’s “father confessor.” O’Conor’s friend Clive Bell (in Old Friends, 1956, p. 163), pointed out that O’Conor “seems to have known . . . most of the more interesting French painters of his generation — the Nabis for instance.” O’Conor’s use of bold color anticipates the Fauves and the German Expressionists. His knowledge of avant-garde painting had a direct impact on the formalist critics Roger Fry and Clive Bell. O’Conor influenced both Robert Vonnoh and Edward Potthast in Grèz, and he oriented Alden Brooks (1840-1931) to Vincent van Gogh’s innovative techniques. Brooks stated that O’Conor was “considered by all the one genius of the crowd.” (Hill, 1987, p. 14). He died at Neuil-sur-Layon on 18 March 1940.

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1950 item #1285735 (stock #682)
Original pen and Ink drawing "Girl on the Beach" by Frank Van Sloun signed lower right. Renowned painter, muralist, etcher and educator. Van Sloun studied in New York City under Robert Henri and members of the Ashcan School. Memberships included the San Francisco Art Association, the Carmel Art Association, Bohemian Club, Society of Mural Painters and California Society of Etchers. Image 8"L x 11"W.