Antiquarian Art Co.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1960 item #473079 (stock #082)
California Impressionist landscape of a field of wildflowers by Helen Glieforst a listed California woman impressionist painter. A beautiful and very decorative art work with a soft impressionist feeling. Oil on masonite board measuring an impressive 24 x 30 inches framed in a quality gallery frame measuring overall 31 x 37 inches.

Biography

Helen Glieforst Impressionist Landscape Born in Crete, Nebraska on February 10, 1903, Helen Gleiforst moved with her family shortly thereafter to San Diego, California. In 1918 her family relocated to Eugene, Oregon, and in 1920 Helen attended the University of Oregon. Because of her father's health, the family returned to Southern California. She married realtor Fred Gleiforst in 1923 and settled in Beverly Hills. It was in the late 1920s that she began to paint and draw. Her teachers included Nicolai Fechin, George Melcher, and John Hubbard Rich. Her instruction with Dedrick Stuber influenced her landscapes and Nell Walker Warner influenced her floral paintings. By the mid-1930s she had established a local reputation as an artist. She became a frequent exhibitor at one man shows in local venues. In the 1950s she had an exhibit at Stanford University. With her husband's retirement in 1960 she began to travel throughout California where she painted many of her landscapes. She stopped her artistic work in the 1980s because of poor health. The full extent of her output became evident after her death when an heir discovered over 500 paintings stored in her home. These works show the strong impressionistic expression of her work that was characteristic of the early plein-air painters of California. Gleiforst died in Los Angeles, California on May 28, 1997. Exhibited: Ebell Society; Beverly Hills & Westwood Women's Clubs; Clearwater Jr. High School, 1936.

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1960 item #449638 (stock #054)
Joseph P. Frey a beautiful Southwest landscape possibly Monument Valley with dramatic sky and panoramic view. Measuring 24x30 inches framed in a quality vintage gallery frame overall 31x37 inches. In excellent condition two small professional restorations not visible on front of image. Originally purchased from the Santa Barbara museum sale. A fine work of art would make a great decorative painting for any interior.

Biography

JOSEPH P. FREY (1892-1977 was born in Walla Walla, Washington on October 17, 1892. At age sixteen Frey began his art studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. He opened his first studio in 1915 in San Francisco during the furor of the Panama Pacific International Exposition and painted many harbor scenes in and around the bay. After serving in World War One, he sailed out of San Francisco and spent many years at sea working as a chef and studying painting in various ports. By 1928 he had settled in southern California where he lived and worked as a chef in Los Angeles, Palm Springs, and Santa Barbara. Frey died in Hawthorne, California on August 17, 1977. His work includes landscapes and marines. Member: Painters & Sculptors of Los Angeles. Biography Courtesy Edan Hughes, "Artists in California, 1786-1940".

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1920 item #519356 (stock #183)
A beautiful impressionist painting of a winter view of German Town Pennsylvania circa 1920 oil on board signed lower left. This painting just recently discovered is directly from a Great Grandfather who was a friend of the Wagner and an artist himself who shared a studio with Wagner. Measuring 8x10 inches framed in a contemporary gallery frame. A great example of this artists work a fine addition to any collection.

Biography

Fredrick Wagner was born in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania in 1864. He received a scholarship to study art at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Eakins and in 1884 was made chief Demonstrator of Anatomy there. In 1885, Wagner left the Academy to make a painting tour of San Antonio, Texas, and then went on to Los Angeles, California, where he painted a number of landscapes and portraits. He returned to Philadelphia as an illustrator for the Philadelphia Press until 1902, and then moved to Norristown, Pennsylvania to paint full time. In 1912, Wagner opened a Philadelphia studio and taught classes in outdoor painting at Addingham, and later, at the Pennsylvania Academy's summer school in Chester Springs. His reputation grew, and he took on additional classes at his studio in the Fuller Building. In 1913, Wagner exhibited in the now famous Armory Show in New York City. He exhibited frequently at the Pennsylvania Academy's annual exhibitions, and in 1914, was awarded the Fellowship Prize. He was awarded Honorable Mentions from the Pittsburgh International, the Philadelphia Art Club, and the Carnegie Institute in 1922. His paintings are in the collections of the Cleveland Museum; St. Louis Museum, MO; Fort Wayne Museum, IN; Kalamazoo Museum, MI; Rochester Museum, NY; Worcester Art Museum, MA, and the Reading Museum, PA. Fred Wagner died in Philadelphia in 1940.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1800 item #1101314 (stock #455)
A fine antique southeast Asian Bronze Buddha 15-17 the century measuring Approx. 5 inches tall without stand mounted to a quality museum mount.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1950 item #1154900 (stock #539)
California Impressionist landscape path with trees by Karl Eugen Neuhaus original oil on canvas signed lower left. Measuring approx. 28 x 30 inches. A fine example of this highly regarded artists work. Biography

Known as a California Impressionist influenced by Tonalism and also an early modernist painter, Karl Neuhaus was also an active lecturer and teacher. Neuhaus was born in Barmen (Wuppertal), Germany, in 1879. He apprenticed with a house painter while studying at the Royal Art School in Kassel, graduating in 1899. He proceeded to the Berlin Royal Institute for Applied Arts where he studied under Otto Eckmann, Max Koch and Carl Brunner. Neuhaus moved to San Francisco, California, in 1904 where he established a studio across a hallway from William Keith. While living in San Francisco he exhibited with the San Francisco Art Association and became a member of the Bohemian Club. After the San Francisco Earthquake in 1906 he relocated to the Monterey peninsula, in the town of Pacific Grove. There he was one of the founders of the Del Monte Art Gallery, which was the first gallery in the United States to show exclusively work by California artists. Between 1907 and 1909 he taught at the San Francisco Institute of Art, and from 1908 to 1949 he taught at the University of California, Berkeley. At the University of California, Berkeley he also served as the first chairman of the Department of Art between 1923 and 1925. During the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition Neuhaus served as Chairman of the Advisory Committee for the West and was also an exhibitor. As a California landscapist he was known for his painted scenes of Mendocino, the Sacramento Valley, Santa Barbara, Monterey, and San Luis Obispo. He contributed to the art community by lecturing all over the state and was also known as a writer. During his career his work was exhibited at the Oakland Museum in 1981, and the Del Monte Gallery from 1907-14. Karl Neuhaus died in Berkeley, California in 1963.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1837 VR item #1098399 (stock #444)
An exquisite antique Burmese Mandalay style gilt bronze Buddha c. 18th century. measuring approx. 13 inches or 33 cm. tall . A fine example would in good antique condition some losses and wear.
All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1900 item #1146970 (stock #520)
A fine antique Chinese carved zitan wood statue of Buddha or a Bodhisattva beautiful patina and fine carved details. Finest quality one solid piece of rare Zitan wood measuring approx. 16.5 inches tall or 42 cm. A fine addition to any collection.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #519358 (stock #184)
A Dutch painting school of Jan Vermeer of an interior scene Picturing a woman at work in a traditional 17th century kitchen. Oil on oak panel beautifully painted framed in a gilt decorative frame. A fine decorative painting would be a nice addition to any collection.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1970 item #494937 (stock #147)
Antiquarian Art Co.
$35,000.00
Claude Buck still life of a rope and sea shells 1966 oil in masonite signed and dated lower left. Measuring Approx. 28x48 inches in excellent condition. A masterful painting by this remarkable American artist. Provenance; the artist’s wife Leslie Buck.

Biography

A leading member of the avant-garde symbolist artists in Chicago, Claude Buck moved there from his birth place of New York City in 1919. He was known for his "fantastic, sometimes disturbing images with allegorical and literary themes" (Kennedy 97) drawn from writings of Edgar Allen Poe, operas by Richard Wagner, classical mythology and New Testament writings from the Bible. Some of these early paintings had nude figures rendered in classical style to express abstract themes developed through dream-like landscapes and disregard of relative scale or relatedness between the figures. These paintings had luminist elements achieved with light-toned paints worked with transparent glazes. In the 1920s to earn money by gaining public favor and also expressing his increasing disdain for modernism, Buck did a number of "hyper-real" portraits, figures and still lifes. These proved popular and aligned him with the opponents of abstraction and their "Sanity in Art" movement whose headquarters were in Chicago. Buck taught drawing and painting at the Chicago Academy of Fine Art from 1921 to 1926, and at the Art Institute, where he took over classes of George Bellows. In New York City before coming to Chicago, Buck had a reputation as a radical artist. He took his first art training from his father, William R. Buck, from the time he was ages three to fourteen, and then until he was twenty-two, he studied at the National Academy of Design where he was nicknamed "Kid Hassam" because his painting reminded viewers of that of Claude Hassam. Buck worked as a scene painter in the theatre and at the Willet Stained Glass company, and in 1914 began portrait commissions to earn money. In New York he founded a group named the Introspectives, which reflected his own problems with melancholy during that period. Members, holding their first exhibition at the Whitney Studio in 1917, were artists who expressed their personal feelings and experiences and included Raymond Jonson and Emil Armin. In this phase of his career, Buck was focused on Old World styles of Leonardo da Vinci, Ralph Blakelock and Albert Pinkham Ryder. In 1929, the Arts Council of New York voted him one of the top one-hundred painters in the United States. In 1949, Buck and his wife, Leslie, moved to California to a studio-home in the Santa Cruz Mountains, and ten years later they settled in Santa Barbara where he died on August 4, 1974. In California, he was a member of the Carmel Art Association, the Santa Cruz Art League that he served as President in 1953,and the Santa Barbara Art Association. His paintings are in the collections of the Santa Cruz Public Library; the Santa Cruz City Museum as well as the Spencer Museum in Lawrence, Kansas; the Brigham Young University Museum; and the Museum of Elgin, Illinois.

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1950 item #1057672 (stock #393)
Original oil on canvas board measuring 16 x 20 in excellent condition.

Biography

Born in a log cabin in Canon City, Colorado, Robert Amick became an illustrator of Western subjects, painter, printmaker, commercial artist and teacher. He grew up in the Colorado cattle country during the 1880s amidst cowboys, Ute and Sioux Indians, homesteaders, and prospectors-"all the characters on the western stage " (Samuels). Amick earned a law degree from Yale University while also taking art courses. After practicing law for two years in Ohio, he became a full-time artist, taking private lessons and studying at the Art Students League. He did illustrations for "Harpers," "Scribner's," "The American," and other publications but was most comfortable with subjects from the life of his background. His western scenes of brilliantly colored landscapes with horses and riders became quite popular, and twelve of them were reproduced as prints for the public schools. He spent much of his career living near New York City in Greenwich, Connecticut where he was, according to a family member, the founder of the Art Society of Greenwich in 1927. Given the circumstances of his background, it is likely he was in Arizona before 1940, but that is not proven.

All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1920 item #1008294 (stock #326)
A fine California Impressionist painting of a view of Mt. Tam with lupine and poppies in the fore ground a small cabin to the left. Oil on canvas signed lower right measuring Approx. 15 x 20 inches in excellent condition but for some age cracking. Biography : Manuel Valencia was born in Marin County, California on October 30, 1856 on the family hacienda called Rancho San Jose, which is now Hamilton Field. A member of one of California's earliest families, Manuel was named after his grandfather who came to California with the Anza Party in 1774 and became administrator of the Presidio in San Francisco. The Valencia’s were given many land grants in the San Francisco Bay area and a street near Mission Dolores is named in honor of his family. Manuel attended Santa Clara College and then established a studio in San Francisco. He began painting when he was quite young and remained a self-taught artist except for a few lessons with Jules Tavernier locally and in Mexico City. The earthquake and subsequent fires in 1906 caused the Valencia’s to move down the peninsula to San Jose, however he commuted daily to his San Francisco studio and worked as a staff artist for the "San Francisco Chronicle" and as an illustrator for the Salvation Army Newspaper. A prolific painter, Valencia is best known for his landscapes and historic scenes of Northern California, which often included nocturnal adobes, missions and pueblos. Following an operation, he died in Sacramento on July 6, 1935. His ashes were scattered on Mount Tamalpais. Source: Edan Hughes, Artists in California, 1786-1940
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1900 item #1110565 (stock #482)
A fine original oil painting signed lower left oil on canvas painted in his time studying in France measuring approx. 16 x 28 in excellent condition.

biography

Born in New York City in 1836, Ransome Holdredge came to California via the Isthmus of Panama in 1858 and worked as a draftsman at the Mare Island Naval Yard. His paintings of the 1860s and early 1870s were signed "Holdridge" and were done in the realistic style of the Hudson River School. During this period he maintained a studio in San Francisco's Donahoe-Kelly Bank Bldg and exhibited locally. In 1874 he and Hiram Bloomer held a joint sale of their paintings to finance European studies. He left in that year and spent about two years studying in France. His obituary states that he was a field artist for Scribner's publications and was with Major Reno's troops at the time of the Custer massacre in 1876. After his studies in France, he returned to San Francisco with a distinctly different style. Paintings done after that time show the influence of the Barbizon School and were signed "Holdredge." His works were in great demand during his lifetime, received rave reviews by the local press, and were often considered superior to those done by William Keith. Holdredge traveled extensively throughout the Northwest, Southwest, the Rockies and western Canada, often living for long periods of time among the various Indian tribes. Due to his malnutrition and alcoholism, his paintings done during the latter part of his life were not of good quality. Like his friend Jules Tavernier, he made considerable money as an artist but did not manage his money well. He died penniless at the Alameda County (CA) Infirmary in April 1899 and was buried at public expense. ASSOCIATIONS San Francisco Art Association (cofounder) Bohemian Club EXHIBITIONS California State Fair, 1881-83 Mechanics' Institute (SF), 1868, 1880, 1886 COLLECTIONS Bohemian Club Oakland Museum Society of California Pioneers Orange County Museum California Historical Society Nevada Museum (Reno) Bancroft Library (UC Berkeley) Crocker Museum (Sacramento) Oregon Historical Society Source: Edan Hughes,

All Items : Archives : Decorative Art : Pre 1800 item #463880 (stock #077)
Chinese Export armorial bowl c.1780 with exquisite hand painted crest measuring approx. 6.5 inches in diameter and 1.5 inches deep. In excellent condition except for two very faint fine hairlines hardly effecting the extraordinary quality of this fine piece.
All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1900 item #918307 (stock #282)
An Antique Japanese Ivory Netsuke of a reclining Buddha with a rich patina and warm color great form. Measuring 4 cm or 1.5 inches in length.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1940 item #484547 (stock #107)
Romona Valencia

A beautiful oil of an early California landscape of wild flowers lupine and poppies. Oil painting on canvas board signed lower right measuring approx. 12 x 16 inches. Framed in a contemporary gallery frame overall 20x24 inches. In excellent condition a fine early piece would be a fine addition to any collection.

Biography

Born in Oakland, California, Ramona Froyland, known as Mona, was a painter of still lifes, portraits, landscapes, marines and later in her life, Madonnas. Her parents were Mabel and Manuel Valencia, both artists who gave Ramona her early instruction. She later attended the California School of Fine Art and the Art Institute of Chicago. Ramona Valencia was a paternal descendant of General Gabriel Valencia, the first governor of Sonora, Mexico under Spanish rule, and the great granddaughter of a man who arrived in California in 1774 and became administrator of the Presidio in San Francisco where the family received many land grants. When she was six years old, in 1906, she and her family moved to San Jose because of the destruction of the San Francisco earthquake and fire. However, the family kept close ties to San Francisco where her father kept his studio. Beginning in the 1960s, Ramona Valencia taught art classes to children and adults from her studio in Castro Valley, California, and she died there on September 22, 1988. She was a member of the Hayward art Association and exhibited at Alameda County Fairs.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1950 item #919447 (stock #286)
A fine vintage Japanese netsuke of a noh mask devil artist signed a very fine carving. In excellent condition measuring approx. 2.5 inches or 6.5 centimeters long. A fine addition to any collection.
All Items : Archives : Fine Art : Pre 1950 item #1104268 (stock #469)
A fine original Oil painting on canvas board signed lower right by Professor Starcce. Sailing boats in harbor in original frame.
All Items : Archives : Decorative Art : Pre 1910 item #490612 (stock #134)
A beautiful example with delicate sliver wire enclosure flower designs on a foil background. Meiji period c.1900 in excellent condition measuring approx. 4.5 inches tall.