Antiquarian Art Co.
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Historical : Pre 1970 item #1089937 (stock #422)
Haight and Ashbury street signs San Francisco California. The original street signs from possibly the most famous street corner in the world. Circa late 1960s or early 1970s they later were mounted high up on he traffic light standard please view pictures. A chance to own a decorative historical item great for display in a music club or game room or rock museum.
All Items : Antiques : Decorative Art : Metals : Bronze : Pre 1900 item #1315268 (stock #735)
Exquisite pair French gilt bronze 5 light candelabra with cherubs and garland leaf and flower motif supported by a white marble base. Measuring 28" x 13" x 8".
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Netsuke and Related : Pre 1950 item #1059489 (stock #398)
A fine Carved Ivory Netsuke of a man carrying the moon on his back signed Giyoku Seki a masterful piece. Measuring 2.5 inches 5.5 centimeters.
All Items : Fine Art : Prints : Etchings : Pre 1990 item #1298438 (stock #696)
Original etching Gothic Interior Suffolk England by Valerie Thornton, British 1931-1991. Signed lower right. Thornton a painter and printmaker. In the1960s she lived in New York working at Pratt Graphics Art Center. Member Royal Society of Painters-Etchers and Engravers. Her work is in the collections of the Royal Academy, Victoria and Albert Museum, British Museum, Tate Gallery, Fitzwilliam Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York Public Library. Image 26"L x 16.5"W. Framed 38" L x 28" W
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : N. America : American : Pre 1970 item #1412843 (stock #920)
A beautiful vintage original oil painting portrait of a woman in a kimono signed lower right and stamped on verso. Harry Lang Barton, artist and illustrator May 12, 1908 - August 12, 2001 Born in Cleveland and raised in Seattle, Harry Barton spent his life doing the thing he truly loved--painting. Whether in the Pacific Northwest around Seattle, Hood Canal, and Puget Sound, or in the Art Students League, Central Park, and the parks and beaches of Long Island, or in Pennsylvania and New England (he often summered in Rockport, Massachusetts, and Kennebunkport, Maine), Harry's life was art. Harry's career as an artist embraced almost every medium and a great many genres: from charcoal and pen and ink to watercolor, tempura, and oil; from his early work in Seattle as a silk-screen artist and an illustrator for the Sterling Theatres and the telephone company, to his New York work as an illustrator of Western pulp fiction, detective and mystery novels, and movie and fashion advertisements, and finally to his extensive activity as a portrait and landscape painter. In the spring of 1945, he decided to study for the summer at the Art Students League in New York with Frank Reilly, and in the fall of that year he was offered work in New York as an illustrator for Gale Phillips Associates. Moving his family from Seattle, he--along with his wife Pauline and his daughters Joan and Linda--took up residence in Bayside, Queens, and soon moved to the Auburndale area of Flushing, where he had his own freelance studio and where he lived the rest of his life. Over the years his illustrations were featured in The Saturday Evening Post, Argosy, Boy's Life, Down East, and American Artist, as well as on movie billboards for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and in fashion advertising for Lord & Taylor and Gertz department stores. But his main body of work as an illustrator can be found in hard-cover and paperback novels published by such major firms as Dell, Ace Books, Dial Press, and Farrar Straus & Giroux. Harry's paintings and sketches were exhibited in the Philadelphia Museum of Art; in the Salmagundi Club, Lord & Taylor, the Smith Gallery, and Illustration House in New York in the Blue Heron Gallery in Wellfleet, Cape Cod; in the Schaff Gallery in Cincinnati; and in Mast Cove Gallery in Kennebunkport. He received a number of prizes for his work, and his paintings are held in private collections in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Harry was a member of the American Artists Professional League, the Salmagundi Club, and the Art Students League of New York, where he kept on working throughout his life, studying with--in addition to Frank Reilly--Samuel Edmund Oppenheini, William Draper, and Everett Raymond Kintsler. Harry loved the Art Students League and was very proud of being a Life Member. His Saturday jaunts to the League continued right up to the time when the League closed for the summer three months before he died. He was fortunate in being able to do what he enjoyed most to the very end. less
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : Europe : Pre 1800 item #1248582 (stock #624)
Oil painting Madonna of the Finch after Raphael. An 18th century old master copy of the great masterpiece by Raphael. Presented in a fine hand carved 24K gold leafed antique frame. Image 25.5"L x 18.5"W. Overall framed size 34 x 28".
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : N. America : American : Pre 1960 item #1427492 (stock #961)
Vintage American Impressionist Oil Painting Girl Flowers on the Beach by Barton. Oil on 20 x 24" panel signed lower left presented in a quality gallery frame. Harry Lang Barton, artist and illustrator May 12, 1908 - August 12, 2001 Born in Cleveland and raised in Seattle, Harry Barton spent his life doing the thing he truly loved--painting. Whether in the Pacific Northwest around Seattle, Hood Canal, and Puget Sound, or in the Art Students League, Central Park, and the parks and beaches of Long Island, or in Pennsylvania and New England (he often summered in Rockport, Massachusetts, and Kennebunkport, Maine), Harry's life was art. Harry's career as an artist embraced almost every medium and a great many genres: from charcoal and pen and ink to watercolor, tempura, and oil; from his early work in Seattle as a silk-screen artist and an illustrator for the Sterling Theatres and the telephone company, to his New York work as an illustrator of Western pulp fiction, detective and mystery novels, and movie and fashion advertisements, and finally to his extensive activity as a portrait and landscape painter. In the spring of 1945, he decided to study for the summer at the Art Students League in New York with Frank Reilly, and in the fall of that year he was offered work in New York as an illustrator for Gale Phillips Associates. Moving his family from Seattle, he--along with his wife Pauline and his daughters Joan and Linda--took up residence in Bayside, Queens, and soon moved to the Auburndale area of Flushing, where he had his own freelance studio and where he lived the rest of his life. Over the years his illustrations were featured in The Saturday Evening Post, Argosy, Boy's Life, Down East, and American Artist, as well as on movie billboards for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and in fashion advertising for Lord & Taylor and Gertz department stores. But his main body of work as an illustrator can be found in hard-cover and paperback novels published by such major firms as Dell, Ace Books, Dial Press, and Farrar Straus & Giroux. Harry's paintings and sketches were exhibited in the Philadelphia Museum of Art; in the Salmagundi Club, Lord & Taylor, the Smith Gallery, and Illustration House in New York in the Blue Heron Gallery in Wellfleet, Cape Cod; in the Schaff Gallery in Cincinnati; and in Mast Cove Gallery in Kennebunkport. He received a number of prizes for his work, and his paintings are held in private collections in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Harry was a member of the American Artists Professional League, the Salmagundi Club, and the Art Students League of New York, where he kept on working throughout his life, studying with--in addition to Frank Reilly--Samuel Edmund Oppenheini, William Draper, and Everett Raymond Kintsler. Harry loved the Art Students League and was very proud of being a Life Member. His Saturday jaunts to the League continued right up to the time when the League closed for the summer three months before he died. He was fortunate in being able to do what he enjoyed most to the very end
All Items : Fine Art : Prints : Etchings : Pre 1940 item #1175006 (stock #573)
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973) Oath of the Women from Lysistrata Bloch 267-272. Original pencil signed etching from the deluxe edition of 100 signed etchings. Printed by Roger Lacourière (French, 1892–1966) Date: 1934 Medium: Etching Dimensions: plate: 8 11/16 x 5 3/4 in. (22.1 x 14.6 cm) sheet: 15 1/8 x 11 1/8 in. (38.4 x 28.3 cm) Condition is very good some minor staining and foxing very slight minor surface creasing.
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Watercolor : Pre 1980 item #1431438 (stock #962)
Vintage Modernist Watercolor Americas Cup Yacht Sailing Races by Willard Bond. Presented matted and framed. Biography By DENNIS HEVESI Published: June 10, 2012 In First Around, one of Willard Bond's best-known paintings, two towering yachts are caught in a roiling sea. The one to the fore is rounding a mark, sharply heeled in the wind, its crew crammed by the upper rail to keep it from capsizing. It has not yet raised its spinnaker, the balloonlike sail toward the bow. Perilously close by, the other boat has just turned the marker, its billowing spinnaker a virtual rainbow of iridescent pink, blue, maroon and white. All this is captured in Mr. Bond's bold, swirling strokes that verge on the abstract. "Bond creates paintings, not around what boats look like, but what it feels like to be aboard or nearby, watching them move fast — big, speeding boats, often only inches apart," J. Russell Jinishian wrote in his 2003 book, Bound for Blue Water, a comprehensive study of marine art. "Crews scramble, sails drop and raise in a flurry of activity," Mr. Jinishian wrote. "The tension is high, adrenaline pumps, orders are yelled, spray flies, seas and heads pound, your whole world spins as you are unconscious of everything else around you. If you want to know what it is like to be in the heat of a yacht race, just look at a painting by Willard Bond." Mr. Bond, whose images line the walls of thousands of homes — particularly those of avid sailors — died of congestive heart failure on May 19 in Yountville, Calif., his daughter, Gretchen Bond de Limur, said. He was 85. Until moving to California several months ago to be near his daughter, Mr. Bond had divided his time between his apartment in Brooklyn Heights and the 30-foot-high geodesic dome he built decades ago as a second studio near Barryville, N.Y., in the Catskills. Even there, he could conjure up images of sailing vessels and the sea. In Knarr Class, Mr. Bond depicted the copious mast of a wooden racing boat. Against a glowering sky, with perhaps a storm on the horizon, the boat is tilted toward its port side. Subtle blues, greens and grays blend in the water and the clouds, with white dots hinting of structures on the distant coast. Over five decades as a marine artist, Mr. Bond created hundreds of watercolor and oil paintings, "everything from cruising sailboats to America's Cup yachts," said Jeffrey Schaub, owner of the Annapolis Marine Art Gallery in Maryland and a longtime representative of Mr. Bond. He said Bond originals sell for up to $30,000, his limited-edition lithographs for up to $1,000, and his posters for up to $45. "Willard Bond was an original," said Jeanne C. Potter, director of the Maritime Gallery at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut. "Willard would often hear from the sailors who raced that that is the way it is out there, and that he was the only artist that got it." He found his passion as a teenager sailing on Lake Coeur d'Alene in Idaho, where his grandparents owned a houseboat. Willard Gordon Bond was born in Colfax, Wash., on June 7, 1926, to Arthur and Hallie Gilleland Bond. The family later moved to Lewiston, Idaho. When not sailing on Lake Coeur d'Alene, the young man worked for several summers as a fire spotter for the United States Forest Service. After serving in the Navy in the Pacific from 1944 to 1946, he attended the Art Institute of Chicago, then moved to New York to study at the Pratt Institute, from which he graduated in 1949. In a loft on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Mr. Bond began creating large-scale abstract oil paintings and ceramic murals while supporting himself as a set designer, lighting technician and occasional actor in Off Broadway theaters. In the early 1970s he went to the island of Jamaica, where, inspired by Buckminster Fuller, he built geodesic-dome homes in the jungle, as well as two large domes for a school, commissioned by the Peace Corps. It was after returning to New York in 1976 and becoming a pier master at the South Street Seaport — he welcomed the tall ships of Operation Sail to New York Harbor for the bicentennial celebration — that Mr. Bond turned to marine art. His works began selling at galleries. At the same time, his daughter said, he sailed his own small boat off Long Island before graduating to a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, which had long been used for oyster dredging. In addition to his daughter, Mr. Bond is survived his longtime partner, Lois Friedel Bond (they were once married, then divorced and then began living together again in Brooklyn), and two grandchildren. His first two marriages also ended in divorce. Not all Mr. Bond's paintings reflect a turbulent sea. There is an almost palpable peace to his "Running Home," an oil painting that depicts four yachts far in the distance, their sails — black and white, red and white, blue and white, and pure red — full as they head to port at the end of a day of racing. "Running" means that the wind is behind them
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : Europe : Italian : Pre 1900 item #1340864 (stock #776)
A beautiful antique Italian Neapolitan gouache painting grand tour era 19th century. Depicting the bay of Naples in the Moonlight with a couple on a bridge Mt. Vesuvius Erupting in the distance. Image 6"L x 9"W. Matted and framed overall size 13" L x 16" W.
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : Europe : French : Pre 1940 item #1432392 (stock #966)
Antiquarian Art Co.
Inquire for Price
A beautiful colorful post impressionist oil painting by Charles Camoin (1879 - 1965). Oil on canvas signed lower right and noted painted in Paris. Born in Marseille in 1879, Camoin studied firstly in his home city before moving to Paris in the 1890s to study under the influential and controversial Symbolist painter Gustave Moreau at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. Here he met some of the artists who would go on to define French painting in the early part of the 20th century, including Henri Matisse, Albert Marquet, Henri Manguin, Andre Derain and Maurice de Vlaminck. However, it was a move to the south of France in 1900 which was instrumental in defining Camoin's artistic career. Following in the footsteps of Van Gogh and Gauguin, he painted many of the places that they had frequented and, moving to Aix-en- Provence, he met Cezanne whose influence was key in developing Camoin's colourist style.
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : Europe : British : Pre 1837 VR item #1089907 (stock #421)
Antiquarian Art Co.
Price on Request
Richard Bonington original oil on canvas of a old English town view signed very faintly lower right measuring approx. 9 x 12 inches framed in a contemporary gallery frame. Provenance: British Consulate San Francisco.

Biography

Richard Parkes Bonington was born in the town of Arnold, 4 miles from Nottingham in England. His father was successively a gaoler, a drawing master and lace-maker, and his mother a teacher. Bonington learned watercolour painting from his father and exhibited paintings at the Liverpool Academy at age 11. In 1817, Bonington's family moved to Calais, France where his father had set up a lace factory. At this time, Bonington started taking lessons from the painter François Louis Thomas Francia, who trained him in English watercolour painting. In 1818, the family moved to Paris to open a lace retail outlet. It was Paris where he first met Eugène Delacroix, who he became friends with. He worked for a time producing copies of Dutch and Flemish landscapes in the Louvre. In 1820, he started attending the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where he studied under Antoine-Jean, Baron Gros. It was around this time that Bonington started going on sketching tours in the suburbs of Paris and the surrounding countryside. His first paintings were exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1822. He also began to work in lithography, illustrating Baron Taylor’s "Voyages pittoresques dans l'ancienne France" and his own architectural series Restes et Fragmens". In 1824, he won a gold medal at the Paris Salon along with John Constable and Anthony Vandyke Copley Fielding. Bonington died of tuberculosis on 23 September 1828 at 29 Tottenham Street in London, only 25 years old.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Musical : String : Pre 1980 item #1027839 (stock #374)
One of the rarest colors ever on an American Standard Stratocaster "Razz Berry", which made its only appearance in the Oct 1 88 price list, and was dropped by the time the '89 price list was printed. Also noteworthy, this finish wasn't available on the American Standard Strat, only the "Plus" model, but was fairly common on the HM Strat from this era. The Plus model first appeared in 1987, within a year of the first American Standards, the earliest was Nov '86. Many people incorrectly identify these as 1984 models due to the "E4xxxxx" serial numbers. The fact is, the only American Strats being produced in '84, '85, and most of '86 were the USA Vintage Series, which had the serial number on the neck plate. Any "E4" serial number you come across is an late '86 at best, but most are '87 and '88, and even a few '89's. The Plus was a souped up American Standard, with an $849 retail price that was $200 higher. It has a bunch of upgraded parts, most notably a trio of gold Lace Sensor pickups, which produce almost no hum and are non-magnetic which means no magnetic string pull and, thus, longer sustain. Another innovation is the TBX (Tone Bass Expander) control for the middle/neck pickups which looks like a regular tone knob but underneath the guard it's a stacked pot - with a center detent, it works like a tone control from "5" to "1", and TBX from "6" to "10". You'll notice the headstock which has the bold silver logo of the era but...no string trees, which aren't necessary due to the staggered height Sperzel tuners. The Sperzels are excellent tuners and unlike vintage tuners you don't need to wrap the string around the tree. Just insert the string through the tuner post and cut it as close as you want - once you screw down the back it's locked into place and usually tunes to pitch in around 1/4th revolution of the post. Another innovative feature is the "tilt adjust" neck, in use since the early 70's, with access through the neck plate. With an Allen wrench you can adjust the neck angle; a great improvement removing the neck repeatedly until you find a shim with the perfect thickness. In place of the stock nut this model used an Wilkinson roller nut (later models used an LSR with bearings) which reduces friction over the nut and helps maintain tuning stability. This model is outfitted with the Schaller locking strap pins, which made their debut with the '83 Strat Elite. Although not used in 1988, later models also included a "Tremsetter" inside the trem cavity, which is a spring-loaded device that prevents de-tuning if you break a string. About this guitar: Extremely clean - a true closet classic that looks like it was played for a month or two and then put away. The frets are as clean as the day they left the factory. There are no buckle scratches and no major flaws anywhere. I would rate it around an easy 9.5 since it's amazingly clean. Also, at 7.6 lbs., it's definitely on the light side for an American Standard era ('86 - '99). If you're a collector of different colored Strats, the most rare are Tanqueray Tonic, Graffiti Yellow, and Razz Berry this would be a valuable Stratocaster in any condition due to the rarity. Includes case and trem arm
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1447467 (stock #981)
A beautiful antique standing gilt bronze Buddha, Thailand. Mid 19th Century. Standing in the fearless gesture (abhaya mudra) with arms bent & palms forward. In good antique condition losses to the gold gilt wear commensurate of age. A fine example would be a nice addition to any collection or decor. Measuring 8ʺW × 5ʺD × 20ʺH The Rattanakosin kingdom is one of the most powerful kingdoms in the history of Siam. Unlike Sukothai and Lanna styles, which vanished, Rattanakosin style was the continuation of Ayutthaya style and quite different from other styles. The material of choice was bronze
All Items : Fine Art : Drawings : Pre 1900 item #1366082 (stock #813)
Masterful pen and ink drawing titled "The Butterfly Catcher" by well-listed academic artist Jehan Georges Vibert (French, 1840 – 1902). Signed lower right. Housed in a gilt and gesso wood frame under glass and a single layer of white matting with a gilt fillet. Visible image measures 5.5" W x 7.5" H overall paper measures 8"W x10" H. Minor yellowing, commensurate with age. Vibert was known for his genre scenes, often of cardinals and clergy. He was born in Paris, the son of engraver and publisher Théodore Vibert, and grandson of the influential rose-breeder Jean-Pierre Vibert. He began his artistic training at a young age under the instruction of his maternal grandfather, engraver Jean-Pierre-Marie Jazet. Vibert was more interested in painting than engraving and entered the studio of Félix-Joseph Barrias and eventually the École des Beaux-Arts when he was sixteen. He remained at the École for six years under the instruction of historic painter François-Edouard Picot. Vibert debuted at the Salon of 1863 with La Sieste (The Siesta) and Repentir (Repentance). During the Franco-Prussian War, Vibert became a sharpshooter and was wounded at the battle of Malmaison in October 1870. He was awarded the Légion d’Honneur and became a Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur in recognition of his sacrifice. He became an Officier of the Légion d’Honneur in 1882. Vibert submitted work to the Salon until 1899. The popularity of his works spread, notably in America, and fetched high prices including commissions from John Jacob Astor IV and William Vanderbilt. A large collection of works by Vibert was amassed by the heiress May Louise Maytag on behalf of then bishop of Miami Coleman Carroll, who greatly fancied them. This large cache was then donated to the Florida seminary St. John Vianney College in Miami. At this location the extremely impressive collection has had a somewhat checkered conservation history, as well as exhibition history due to the discomfiture of later bishops with the seeming anti-clericalism of the paintings (lighthearted debaucheries, etc.). less DETAILS Dimensions 14.75ʺW × 2.0ʺD × 16.5ʺH
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Oil : Europe : Pre 1960 item #1086153 (stock #417)
Claude Lacaze original oil on panel cubist nudes by the sea signed lower left. measuring Approximately 20 x 30 inches in excellent condition.

Biography

Lacaze was a painter who was heavily influenced by Cubism and Post-Cubism, particularly by fellow Bordeaux painters such as André L’Hote. He was born in Angoulême, Charente and studied at the Lycée Montaigne in Bordeaux and it was there, under an inspirational art master, that his desire to be an artist was initiated. He enrolled at L’École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux and studied under André Edouard Marty. At first, his style was decidedly Cubist, showing the influence of Picasso through the aforementioned L’Hote. However he softened the linear effect somewhat as his career developed and this is particularly apparent in his paintings of nudes. He staged his first solo exhibition in Paris in Rue Visconti quite soon after leaving art school. He also exhibited through his career at other locations in Paris, his home city of Bordeaux, Sainte Maxine, Angoulême and Périgueux but he seems not to have had a particularly commercial attitude to his work apparently sometimes not even turning up to the opening nights. Lacaze was appointed Professor of Fine Art at Collège de Puyguillen and also joined the artistic group Maison des Artistes. Exhibitions:  Paris, Galerie Visconiti; Périgueux, N.T.P.; Angoulême, Galerie Tison d’Argence; Bordeaux, Galerie du Loup; Sainte Maxine, Galerie L’Oleil Fauve. The Musée des Beaux Arts de Bordeaux also exhibited his work.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #1269049 (stock #653)
This image of the Buddha is in a naturalistic style most probably prompted by colonial influences. It has been carved in wood, lacquered and gilded and inset with glass fragments backed with coloured foil (known as hman-zi- shwei-cha) and overlaid thayo work, a process whereby thin, rolled strands of lacquer and ash putty are applied in patterns. The image is in the Mandalay style and shows the Buddha seated in vajrasana, with his right hand gesturing to the earth in the bhumisparsa mudra position. It is probably the most characteristic form of religious sculpture in Burma (Lowry, 1974). The posture, known as 'calling the earth to witness', represents the moment when the Buddha was seated in meditation under the Bodhi tree during the evening before his enlightenment. Mara asked him to name anyone who would give evidence that he had given alms, and the Buddha motioned to the earth with his right hand and said that the earth would bear witness to that - in a previous incarnation when he was known as Vessantara, he had given alms to such an extent that the earth had begun to quake. The image shows the Buddha seated on a low platform or socle and dressed in ample robes with naturalistic folds and pleating. Earlier images of the Buddha across Southeast Asia tended to show the monastic robes in a much more schematic way. The eyes have been inlaid with a white material, usually described as mother-of-pearl, with black pupils probably painted on with black lacquer. The cranial protuberance (unisha) is rounded and the head decorated with tight curls in low relief. Unusually, the curls are arrayed in a pattern on the back of the head, rather than being in a more typical, somewhat random manner. The image has been lacquered with black lacquer and then gilded. Overall, the image is very sculptural and decorative: the naturalistic flow of the robes, and the refinement of the face, are particularly pleasing.37"T x 32"W x 24"D. In good antique condition some minor losses and age cracking.
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Pre 1910 item #1431804 (stock #965)
Beautiful large antique original oil painting of a European village and landscape by famed American painter Colin Campbell Cooper. Oil on canvas signed and dated lower right 1907. Presented in a quality antique gold leaf frame. In good antique condition some wear commensurate of age. Biography A resident and distinguished impressionist painter of both the East and West Coasts, Colin Campbell Cooper earned an international reputation with his depictions of landscapes, florals, portraits, gardens, interiors and figures. He was especially noted for street scenes and skyscrapers of New York and Philadelphia, and his impressionist* palette was inspired by Childe Hassam, whom he met in New York beginning in the 1890s. In the later part of his life, he focused on West Coast subject matter and espoused The California Style* of watercolor painting, a bold, aggressive new oil-painting look to a medium that had traditionally been used more modestly. He was born in Philadelphia to an upper class family where the father was a surgeon, and he, the son, was encouraged by his educated family to pursue art. He was also inspired by the art he saw at the 1876 Philadelphia Exposition*. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy* of the Fine Arts with Thomas Eakins and in Paris at the Academies Julian*, Vitti, and Delecluse*. During that time, he traveled throughout Europe and painted picturesque architectural scenes, which gained him widespread recognition. Sadly many of these paintings were lost in a fire of 1896. From 1895 to 1898, he was instructor of watercolor at the Drexel Institute in Philadelphia and then moved to New York City from where he and his artist wife, Emma Lampert, traveled throughout the world in search of subject matter. On a European trip in 1912, they sailed on the Carpathia and became part of the rescue operation of the sinking Titanic, an experience that Cooper depicted in a painting, View of Steamship Carpathia passing along the edge of the ice flow after recuing survivors of the Titanic (1912). Of this event it was written by an historian that Carpathia, built 1902, "was sailing from New York City to Rijeka on the night of Sunday, 14 April 1912. Among her passengers were renowned American painters Colin Campbell Cooper and his wife Emma, journalist Lewis P. Skidmore, photographer Dr. Francis H. Blackmarr and Charles H. Marshall, whose three nieces were traveling aboard the Titanic. . . .At 4 o'clock in the morning Carpathia arrived at the scene after working her way through dangerous ice fields. Carpathia was able to save 705 people, all that survived the sinking of Titanic. Carpathia, outbound for the Mediterranean prior to the distress call, ferried the survivors to New York." (lostliners.com) The Coopers first went to California in 1915, spending the winter in Los Angeles and in 1921, settled in Santa Barbara, where he served as Dean of Painting at the Santa Barbara Community School of the Arts*. He was a member of numerous associations including the California Art Club*, Salmagundi Club*, and the National Academy of Design*. His work is in many museums including the Cincinnati Art Museum, the St. Louis Museum, and the Oakland Museum